SmithDavidson Gallery

Stand:   531

Modern and Contemporary Art

SmithDavidson Gallery
7580 NE 4th Court
Suite, 107 & 108
Miami, FL 33137
United States
T  +1 786 397 5546
M   +1 786 775 2016
info@smith-davidson.com
smith-davidson.com
Tintorettostraat 3
1077 RM AMSTERDAM
Netherlands
T  +31 20 626 59 45
info@smith-davidson.com
www.smith-davidson.com

Gallery Information

  • Gabriëlle Davidson Director
  • Paul Geerlings Contact person - Gallery Manager
  • David Smith Director

Founded in 1969, SmithDavidson Gallery, is one of the leading galleries in the Netherlands, specializing in Modern and Contemporary Art.
After Leslie Smith, the founder of the gallery, passed away in 1990, his son David took over the business, becoming the second generation of Smiths to run the company. David’s reign over the past 25 years changed the gallery focus, moving into Impressionist, Modern and Contemporary Art. Today the SmithDavidson Gallery collection and program consists out of two main pillars:
Modern and Contemporary Art.

A special mention should be made concerning Modern and Contemporary Australian Indigenous Art. This movement forms an important part of the collection and is one of the specialties of David Smith. During a six weeks stay in Australia, as part of a round the world trip in 2006, David Smith and his wife Gabriëlle Davidson fell in love with this art movement. They came back to the Netherlands with no less than fourteen pieces for their private collection. A year later, Dr. Simon Levie, the former director of the Rijksmuseum, opened the gallery’s new affiliate in Amsterdam with a first Contemporary Aboriginal Art exhibition. Since then, Smith-Davidson Gallery has become one of the foremost dealers of Contemporary Aboriginal Art in the world.

The collection can be viewed at the 400 square meters Amsterdam gallery on the Minervaplein and at two exhibition spaces at Miami Ironside. SmithDavidson Gallery also exhibits at five major international art fairs every year (such as TEFAF, Zona Maco and Art Miami) and enjoys having an international clientèle, including a number of important museums and private collections.

Artists Exhibited at the fair:

  • Willem van Leen

    Willem van Leen

  • Caspar Berger

    Caspar Berger

  • Fernando Botero

    Fernando Botero

    Other Dealers:
    Also exhibited by:
    W&K-Wienerroither & Kohlbacher
    Also represented by:
    Studio 2000 Art Gallery Blaricum
  • Alexander CALDER

    Alexander CALDER

  • Jean-Pierre Cassigneul

    Jean-Pierre Cassigneul

  • Marc Chagall
  • Carlos Cruz-Diez

    Carlos Cruz-Diez

  • Kees van Dongen

    Kees van Dongen

  • Kees van Dongen

    Kees van Dongen

  • Dongen

    Dongen

  • Jackie Kurljunyintja Giles Tjapaltjarri

    Jackie Kurljunyintja Giles Tjapaltjarri

    Biography : Jackie (Kurltjunyintja) Giles Tjapaltjarri was born in the late 1930s in the bush east of Kiwirrkurra, Northern Territory, at a kangaroo dreaming site called Tjamu Tjamu. He grew up with his extended family, living off their own country and travelling vast distances through the desert on foot. They watched the European presence in their country grow and in the 1950s where forced to move to the Warburton Mission 240km south of Patjarr. By this time he was well known and widely respected as a traditional Aboriginal healer (Maparntjarra) in the Western Desert, a gift which was passed on to him by his father. He was one of the first who painted for the Warburton Art Project and many people learned by watching him. During a period of residence in Kiwirrkurra in 2003, he started to paint for Papunya Tula Artists. Mr. Giles is a founding member of Kayili Artists, a community owned enterprise in Patjarr (Karilwara). The paintings of the Kayili Artists describe the intricate network of Dreamings (Tjukurrpa) that feature in the landscape and the creative journeys of the Tingarri (ancestral men and women). The paintings of Mr. Giles consist of complex meandering lines of contrasting colours that create a sense of depth. His designs are associated with engravings on pearl shell and hard wood shields that were traded in the desert from the west coast. In 2007 the artist was elected as a finalist in the 24th National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Art Award. Exhibition : Major Collections:
    Warburton Community Acrylic Collection
    Lagerburg-Swift Collection
    James McCourt Collection
    National Gallery of Victoria
    Art Gallery of NSW
    Vromm Collection, The Netherlands
    Rectus Collection, Germany
    Charles Darwin University Collection
    Levi-Kaplan Collection, Seattle
    Queensland Art Gallery
    The Luczo Collection San Francisco, California
    Artist's Objects:
  • Damien Hirst

    Damien Hirst

    Biography : The impulses driving Damien Hirst's work stem from dilemmas inherent in human life: 'I am aware of mental contradictions in everything, like: I am going to die and I want to live for ever. I can't escape the fact and I can't let go of the desire'. The materials he uses often shock, but he says he 'uses shock almost as a formal element, not so much to thrust his work in the public eye, but rather to make aspects of life and death visible'. Exhibition : The impulses driving Damien Hirst's work stem from dilemmas inherent in human life: 'I am aware of mental contradictions in everything, like: I am going to die and I want to live for ever. I can't escape the fact and I can't let go of the desire'. The materials he uses often shock, but he says he 'uses shock almost as a formal element, not so much to thrust his work in the public eye, but rather to make aspects of life and death visible'.

    Detailed Description : War Child Ink on paper 6 in(15 cm) x 3 in(8 cm) Signed Other Dealers:
    Also exhibited by:
    Robilant+Voena, London-Milan-St Moritz
    W&K-Wienerroither & Kohlbacher
    Waterhouse & Dodd
    Alon Zakaim Fine Art
  • Rover Thomas joolama

    Rover Thomas joolama

  • Emily Kame Kngwarreye

    Emily Kame Kngwarreye

  • Kudditji Kngwarreye

    Kudditji Kngwarreye

    Biography : Like his famous older sister, the late great Emily Kngwarreye, Kudditji Kngwarreye (pronounced goo-beh-chee) has a deserved reputation as an innovator yet at the same time being a well respected artist. Born around 1928, Kudditji Kngwarreye had a traditional bush upbringing in the Utopia region before starting a long career as a stockman and mine worker. As an Anmatyerre elder and custodian of many important Dreamings, Kudditji was originally inspired by the work coming out of Papunya to paint his own Dreamings, telling of the travels and law of the Emu ancestors. Starting in 1986, his precisely dotted Emu Dreaming paintings, which reflected his traditional upbringing and utilised the very fine dots and symbols, became sought after by major galleries in Australia. Then, intrigued by the possibilities of acrylic paint and the kaleidoscope of colours now available to him, Kudditji began to experiment with the synthetic polymer paint to eradicate the pointillist style altogether and to use a heavily loaded paint brush to sweep broadly across the canvas in stages, similar to the western landscape plane. These paintings were romantic images of his country, accentuating the colour and form of the landscape including the depth of the sky in the wet season and in the reds and oranges of the shimmering summer heat. These ground-breaking paintings expressed Kudditji’s extensive knowledge and love of his country in a way never seen previously. Some commentators have seen a strong similarity with his sister Emily's work - but it is not clear who was the first to set out on this path. The demand for his earlier, detailed style, however, moved Kudditji to return to it, and it was only in 2003 at the age of 74 that he began to exhibit the extraordinary, saturated colour paintings that have seen his reputation grow nationally and internationally. His two dimensional spatial constructions innocently refer to Rothko and modernists of the twentieth century. The paintings Exhibition : Like his famous older sister, the late great Emily Kngwarreye, Kudditji Kngwarreye (pronounced goo-beh-chee) has a deserved reputation as an innovator yet at the same time being a well respected artist.

    Born around 1928, Kudditji Kngwarreye had a traditional bush upbringing in the Utopia region before starting a long career as a stockman and mine worker. As an Anmatyerre elder and custodian of many important Dreamings, Kudditji was originally inspired by the work coming out of Papunya to paint his own Dreamings, telling of the travels and law of the Emu ancestors.

    Starting in 1986, his precisely dotted Emu Dreaming paintings, which reflected his traditional upbringing and utilised the very fine dots and symbols, became sought after by major galleries in Australia. Then, intrigued by the possibilities of acrylic paint and the kaleidoscope of colours now available to him, Kudditji began to experiment with the synthetic polymer paint to eradicate the pointillist style altogether and to use a heavily loaded paint brush to sweep broadly across the canvas in stages, similar to the western landscape plane. These paintings were romantic images of his country, accentuating the colour and form of the landscape including the depth of the sky in the wet season and in the reds and oranges of the shimmering summer heat. These ground-breaking paintings expressed Kudditji’s extensive knowledge and love of his country in a way never seen previously. Some commentators have seen a strong similarity with his sister Emily's work - but it is not clear who was the first to set out on this path. The demand for his earlier, detailed style, however, moved Kudditji to return to it, and it was only in 2003 at the age of 74 that he began to exhibit the extraordinary, saturated colour paintings that have seen his reputation grow nationally and internationally.

    His two dimensional spatial constructions innocently refer to Rothko and modernists of the twentieth century. The paintings
  • Marc Lagrange

    Marc Lagrange

    Biography : Evocative, sensual and voluptuous, Marc Lagrange's work celebrates beauty and pleasure. The Antwerp-based photographer, who has a predilection for nudes and portraits, creates luxurious and timeless environments, where eroticism and intimacy play a central part. The chemistry Lagrange has with his models sets him apart from other photographers. He gets them to reveal parts of themselves in a trusting climate, envisaging the shoot as the ultimate performance act. Losing their inhibitions in front of the camera, his models turn into characters, echoing Lagrange's cinematic references. Although they bare it all, his women retain their sense of mystery and elusive charm, making them even more attractive. Harshness and shock are absent from his world. Hedonistic and privileged, his images do not deal with ordinary settings or regular situations. They focus on dreams and fantasies, escaping logic and the constraints of reality. His eye for detail, which is apparent within intricate compositions, underlines a perfectionist streak, served by his use of technique. Famous for shooting with large Polaroids, the Belgian photographer loves textures and a suggestive feel, moving away from the sharp and clinical edge of fashionable photography. Emphasizing shapes and curves, Lagrange places bodies at the center of his artistic research, looking for exciting angles and new perspectives. Pictures happen in his mind first. Lagrange does not do preliminary sketches, even though the occasional mood board may materialize at some stage. The richness of his imagination is enough to keep him going. Lagrange's work has been praised by critics and collected worldwide. He has showcased his photographs through (solo) exhibitions, from Europe to the United States. His “Extra Large Marc Lagrange” show took place in Graz in 2012, occupying 3000 square meters. In 2011, “Maison Lagrange” introduced more than 240 artworks to the public, many of them unseen. The retrospecti
  • Marino Marini

    Marino Marini

    Artist's Objects: Other Dealers:
    Also exhibited by:
    Dickinson
    Galerie Boulakia
    Ludorff
    W&K-Wienerroither & Kohlbacher
    Bowman Sculpture
    Galerie von Vertes
    Also represented by:
    Tornabuoni Art
  • Henri Matisse
  • Esther Giles Nampitjinpa

    Esther Giles Nampitjinpa

  • Naata Nungurrayi

    Naata Nungurrayi

  • Pablo Picasso
  • Gavin Rain

    Gavin Rain

    Biography : Gavin Rain was born in Cape Town on 23 March 1971. He studied Art and Neuropsychology at the University of Cape Town in the 80’s and 90’s. Rain has been painting his whole live, but started with pointillism around 2003/2004. He is influenced by Seurat, Russian avant garde art of the 1900’s and many architects. Earlier in his live, he planned to study architecture, to try and combine his two interests: art and mathematics. In 2011, Rain participated in the 54th Venice Biennale, in the Republic of Costa Rica pavilion with an original portrait of Nobel Peace Prize winner Aung San Suu Kyi. In 2013, he is present in the Republic of Bangladesh pavilion with a work entitled 'Lena'. Exhibition : 2013 Venice Biennale
    2012 Solo: Venice
    2012 Ciao Milan, Milan
    2011 Venice Biennale
    2011 Art Hamptons
    2011 Art Chicago
    2011 Arte Accessibile, Milan
    2011 MiArt, Milan
    2011 Per Capita, Tuscany
    2011 ART van der brugge, Zug
    2011 Per Capita, Arezzo
    2010 Arte in Fiera, Belluno
    2010 MiArt Art Now!, Milan
    2010 Padova Fiere, Padova
    2010 FineArt 2010, Kizo gallery, Kwazulu-Natal
    2010 With Keith Calder, E-Piphany Fine Art, Cape Town
    2010 Angels, Grand Provence, Franschhoek
    2009 African Wave exhibition II, Venice
    2009 Solo: WorldArt gallery, Cape Town
    2009 African Wave exhibition I, Trieste
    2008 African Wave exhibition 0, Treviso
    2008 Solo: VEO gallery, Cape Town
    2008 Erotica Exhibition, Kizo Gallery, Kwazulu-Natal
    2008 Solo Demonstration: Heritage Festival, Kizo Gallery, Kwazulu-Natal
    2007 Solo: Patrice Boussekey Eclectic Gallery, Cape Town
    2007 Solo: WorldArt gallery, Johannesburg.
    2006 Solo: VEO gallery, Cape Town
    2006 Group exhibition: in the Flesh!, KKNK,
    2005 VEO gallery with Richard Scott, Cape Town
    Detailed Description : Technique Up close, Rain’s paintings consist of small concentric dots painted in different colors of acrylic paint. From a distance your eye puts these colors together into one. The further the viewer steps back, the more clear the portrait becomes. He starts his paintings by making a sketch of the portrait he wants to paint. To decide the place of the dots on the canvas, he either uses a grid, made of strings, or projection. The grid takes about ten hours to make, but is more accurate then using projection, so Rain still uses both techniques. Then he picks the colors for the final dots. He starts by deciding the final color that he wants a dot to be and starts working backwards. Rain has a list of 14.000 different dots that he has made. Out of this list, he picks the combination that creates the color he wants. Another important part of the technique is changing each dot size. The white canvas Rain uses as a background means that the smaller the dot, the more white background around it. So the bigger the dots, the darker an area gets and the smaller the dots, the lighter the area becomes. This, combined with the distant final color each dot makes is how the image is created. However, the colors of separate dots will merge together into a new color as well. So, it's not just each dot but also a combination of dots that makes the color. Message Rain’s objective is to broaden people’s visual and cognitive horizons by showing them the fantastic and impossible. By combining his origins, his studies, aptitudes and personal talent, Rain has invented an art that is both unique and participative so that all who look at one of his paintings can perceive the convergence of two opposing pictorial styles: the abstractness of the multitude of colorful concentric circles that thicken into dense and imperfect dots in relief, and the figurative aspect of the image that is defined by the sum of these same dots as the viewer takes a few steps back. It is p
  • Gerhard Richter

    Gerhard Richter

  • Marie-Cécile Thijs

    Marie-Cécile Thijs

    Artist's Objects:
  • Warlimpirrnga Tjapaltjarri

    Warlimpirrnga Tjapaltjarri

  • Paddy Lewis Tjapanangka

    Paddy Lewis Tjapanangka

    Biography : Australian Aboriginal artist Paddy Lewis was born in the late 1920’s west of Mt. Doreen and Yuendumu in Northern Territory. In the mid 1950’s, Paddy and his family were forcibly relocated to the settlement of Yuendumu in line with the government’s assimilation programme. Unable and unwilling to adapt to their new lifestyle, the family moved back into the desert. Not long after their ‘escape’ though, they were again rounded up and brought back to Yuendumu.Paddy is an elder from the Warlpiri language group. His traditional country lies North West of Nyirripi, approximately 500 km from Alice Springs. This area is a remarkably flat space, almost everywhere allowing a view as far as they eye can see for a full 360 degrees. This environment shaped not only his sense of self but also his visual and therefore artistic consciousness. Paddy is a tribal custodian for the site referred to as Mina Mina salt lake which is also painted by his daughters Dorothy Napangardi and Margaret Lewis Napangardi. Paddy started painting for the Warlukurlangu Arts Centre in the 1980‘s. His traditional style for depicting the iconography associated with the Mina Mina dreaming site has provided a close historical record of the designs used for the traditional sand mosaics during tribal ceremony.
  • George ‘Hairbrush’ Tjungurrayi

    George ‘Hairbrush’ Tjungurrayi

    Biography : George Tjungarrayi was born around 1947 in the bush in the Central en Western Desert of Australia. He started painting for Papunya Tula Artists in 1976 and has since developed into one of the master painters of contemporary Pintupi art. Fine lines and beautiful geometric patterns with which he depicts the traditional Tingari Cycle of his spiritual ancestors characterize George Tjungurrayi’s style. Exhibition : National Gallery of Victoria, Australia
    Australia
Genesis and Genius, Art Gallery of New South Wales, Australia

    Groninger Museum, The Netherlands

    Musee des Arts d'Afrique et d'Oceanie, Paris, France
    Solo Exhibiotion, Sister, Brother Nyarrumparra, Papunya Tula Artist Gallery, Alice Springs, Australia
    Detailed Description : George Tjungurrayi’s distinctive style and theme represents the landscape of a soakage water site in bloom, north-west of Lake Mackay in the Western Desert of Australia. The artist’s inspiration comes from Dreamings, stories about the spiritual ancestors of the Aboriginals.
  • Lee ufan

    Lee ufan

    Artist's Objects: