Moretti

Stand:   352

Italian old master paintings

2a-6 Ryder Street
London, SW1Y 6QB
United Kingdom
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Gallery Information

  • Flavio Gianassi
  • Tova Ossad
  • Fabrizio Moretti Contact person
  • Gabriele Caioni

Artists Exhibited at the fair:

  • Francesco Botticini

    Francesco Botticini

  • Giovanni Antonio Canal, called Il Canaletto

    Giovanni Antonio Canal, called Il Canaletto

    Other Dealers:
    Also exhibited by:
    Dickinson
  • Rosselli Cosimo

    Rosselli Cosimo

    Biography : At the age of fourteen he became a pupil of Neri di Bicci, and in 1460 he worked as assistant to his cousin Bernardo di Stefano Rosselli. The first work of Cosimo mentioned by Giorgio Vasari exists in St. Ambrogio, in Florence, over the third altar on the left. It is an Assumption of the Virgin, a youthful and feeble work. In the same church, on the wall of one of the chapels, is a fresco by Cosimo which Vasari praises highly, especially for a portrait of the young scholar Pico of Mirandola. The scene, a procession bearing a miracle-working chalice, is painted with much vigour and less mannerism than most of this artist's work. A picture painted by Rosselli for the church of the Annunziata, with figures of SS. Barbara, Matthew and the Baptist, is in the Academy of Florence. Rosselli also spent some time in Lucca, where he painted several altar-pieces for various churches. A picture attributed to him, taken from the church of St. Girolamo at Fiesole, is now in the National Gallery of London. It is a large retable, with, in the center, St. Jerome in the wilderness kneeling before a crucifix, and at the sides standing figures of St. Damasus and St. Eusebius, St. Paolo and St. Eustachia; below is a predella with small subjects. Though dry and hard in treatment, the figures are designed with much dignity. The Berlin Gallery possesses three pictures by Rosselli: The Virgin in Glory, The Entombment of Christ, and The Massacre of the Innocents. In 1480 Rosselli, together with the chief painters of Florence, was invited by Pope Sixtus IV to Rome to assist in the painting of the frescoes in the Sistine Chapel. Three of these were executed by him The Destruction of Pharaohs Army in the Red Sea, Christ Preaching by the Lake of Tiberias, and The Last Supper. The last of these is well preserved, but is a mediocre work. Vasari's story about the pope admiring Rosselli's paintings more than those of his abler brother painters has probably little foundation. Rosselli's Sistine fres Exhibition : At the age of fourteen he became a pupil of Neri di Bicci, and in 1460 he worked as assistant to his cousin Bernardo di Stefano Rosselli. The first work of Cosimo mentioned by Giorgio Vasari exists in St. Ambrogio, in Florence, over the third altar on the left. It is an Assumption of the Virgin, a youthful and feeble work. In the same church, on the wall of one of the chapels, is a fresco by Cosimo which Vasari praises highly, especially for a portrait of the young scholar Pico of Mirandola. The scene, a procession bearing a miracle-working chalice, is painted with much vigour and less mannerism than most of this artist's work. A picture painted by Rosselli for the church of the Annunziata, with figures of SS. Barbara, Matthew and the Baptist, is in the Academy of Florence.
    Rosselli also spent some time in Lucca, where he painted several altar-pieces for various churches. A picture attributed to him, taken from the church of St. Girolamo at Fiesole, is now in the National Gallery of London. It is a large retable, with, in the center, St. Jerome in the wilderness kneeling before a crucifix, and at the sides standing figures of St. Damasus and St. Eusebius, St. Paolo and St. Eustachia; below is a predella with small subjects. Though dry and hard in treatment, the figures are designed with much dignity.
    The Berlin Gallery possesses three pictures by Rosselli: The Virgin in Glory, The Entombment of Christ, and The Massacre of the Innocents. In 1480 Rosselli, together with the chief painters of Florence, was invited by Pope Sixtus IV to Rome to assist in the painting of the frescoes in the Sistine Chapel. Three of these were executed by him The Destruction of Pharaohs Army in the Red Sea, Christ Preaching by the Lake of Tiberias, and The Last Supper. The last of these is well preserved, but is a mediocre work. Vasari's story about the pope admiring Rosselli's paintings more than those of his abler brother painters has probably little foundation. Rosselli's Sistine fres
  • Taddeo Di Bartolo

    Taddeo Di Bartolo

  • Giovanni Di Paolo

    Giovanni Di Paolo

    Other Dealers:
    Also exhibited by:
    G. Sarti
  • Pier Francesco Fiorentino

    Pier Francesco Fiorentino

  • Tadeo Gaddi

    Tadeo Gaddi

    Biography :
  • Tommaso Manzuoli

    Tommaso Manzuoli

  • Onorio Marinari

    Onorio Marinari

  • Lorenzo Monaco

    Lorenzo Monaco

  • Lorenze Monaco

    Lorenze Monaco

  • Tommaso del Mazza Painter close to

    Tommaso del Mazza Painter close to

  • Pier Francesco Fiorentino Pseudo

    Pier Francesco Fiorentino Pseudo

  • Pier Francesco Fiorentino Pseudo

    Pier Francesco Fiorentino Pseudo

  • Cosimo Rosselli

    Cosimo Rosselli

    Detailed Description : The tondo was correctly ascribed to Cosimo Rosselli by Everett Fahy in 1973. Fahy also adverted to the painting’s provenance: in the 1920s it was in the collection of Baron Von Liphart in Munich . The attribution was confirmed by the same scholar in 2001, in the catalogue of the exhibition at Winter Park, in Florida, dedicated to the Florentine painter; it also includes a list of the works attributed to Rosselli by Fahy . The painting presents a scene rarely represented in Renaissance tondi: the return of the twelve-year old Jesus from the temple as described in Luke’s Gospel (2: 41-51): “Now his parents went to Jerusalem every year at the feast of the Passover. And when he was twelve years old, they went up according to custom; and when the feast was ended, as they were returning, the boy Jesus stayed behind in Jerusalem. His parents did not know it, but supposing him to be in the company, they went a day’s journey, and they sought him among their kinsfolk and acquaintances. After three days they found him in the temple […] And when they saw him they were astonished; and his mother said to him: ‘Son, why have you treated us so? Behold, your father and I have been looking for you anxiously.’ And he said to them, ‘How is it that you sought me? Did you not know that I must be in my Father’s house?’ And they did not understand the saying which he spoke to them. And he went down with them and came to Nazareth”. Against the background of the Temple of Jerusalem, the Holy Family is about to set out on its return journey to their home in Nazareth. The Virgin’s excited movements, and the heartfelt glance she casts at her son, seem to express the reproof that the Mother, according to the gospel passage, addresses to her Son who, in turn, gesticulating, seems to wish to reply and to justify his conduct. In the distance, the temple, only partially visible, alludes to the previous events and shows, in miniature, the scene of Jesus seated among th
  • GIOVANNI GEROLAMO SAVOLDO

    GIOVANNI GEROLAMO SAVOLDO

    Biography : Savoldo was a member of the important early sixteenth-century Brescian school which included Romanino and Moretto da Brescia. The earliest certain documentary record occurs only in 1506, when Savoldo, already in his mid-20s, is recorded as "master" in Parma. Two years later, in 1508, he was inscribed in the Arte dei medici e degli speciali in Florence. The Holy Hermits (Venice, Galleria dell'Accademia, signed and dated 1520, Valcanover, 1985) is the earliest securely dated work by Savoldo, and it is related to the Prophet Elijah (Washington, National Gallery). In 1521 Savoldo was called to complete the monumental Madonna and Child with Saints in the Church of San Niccolo in Treviso. Beginning at this time, the artist is recorded frequently in Venice, which had a decisive influence on the evolution of his style. In 1524 Savoldo contracted for the Madonna and Child in Glory with Saints (Milan, Brera) for the Church of San Domenico in Pesaro. From the mid-1520s also dates the Tobias and the Archangel (Rome, Galleria Borghese) and the half-length Magdalen (London, National Gallery) in which a Venetian treatment of light is combined with an inherent Lombard tendency to finely realized naturalistic detail. The Portrait of a Warrior (Paris, Louvre) marks the increasing inventiveness of Savoldo's work by the early 1530s. In 1533 he completed the Madonna and Child in Glory with Saints for the Church of Santa Maria in Organo in Verona. The Saint Matthew and the Angel (New York, Metropolitan Museum of Art) dates from the mid-1530s. According to Vasari (ed. Milanesi, vol. 6, p. 507), many of Savoldo's works were to be seen in Venice as well as Milan, where he was working for Duke Francesco II Sforza probably during the early or mid 1530s. The Aretine biographer emphasized Savoldo's night scenes illuminated by fire. Savoldo was married to a Flemish woman, which may, in part, account for the striking influence of Flemish pictures, especially in the earlier work of Sa Exhibition : Savoldo was a member of the important early sixteenth-century Brescian school which included Romanino and Moretto da Brescia. The earliest certain documentary record occurs only in 1506, when Savoldo, already in his mid-20s, is recorded as "master" in Parma. Two years later, in 1508, he was inscribed in the Arte dei medici e degli speciali in Florence. The Holy Hermits (Venice, Galleria dell'Accademia, signed and dated 1520, Valcanover, 1985) is the earliest securely dated work by Savoldo, and it is related to the Prophet Elijah (Washington, National Gallery). In 1521 Savoldo was called to complete the monumental Madonna and Child with Saints in the Church of San Niccolo in Treviso. Beginning at this time, the artist is recorded frequently in Venice, which had a decisive influence on the evolution of his style. In 1524 Savoldo contracted for the Madonna and Child in Glory with Saints (Milan, Brera) for the Church of San Domenico in Pesaro. From the mid-1520s also dates the Tobias and the Archangel (Rome, Galleria Borghese) and the half-length Magdalen (London, National Gallery) in which a Venetian treatment of light is combined with an inherent Lombard tendency to finely realized naturalistic detail. The Portrait of a Warrior (Paris, Louvre) marks the increasing inventiveness of Savoldo's work by the early 1530s. In 1533 he completed the Madonna and Child in Glory with Saints for the Church of Santa Maria in Organo in Verona. The Saint Matthew and the Angel (New York, Metropolitan Museum of Art) dates from the mid-1530s. According to Vasari (ed. Milanesi, vol. 6, p. 507), many of Savoldo's works were to be seen in Venice as well as Milan, where he was working for Duke Francesco II Sforza probably during the early or mid 1530s. The Aretine biographer emphasized Savoldo's night scenes illuminated by fire. Savoldo was married to a Flemish woman, which may, in part, account for the striking influence of Flemish pictures, especially in the earlier work of Sa Other Dealers:
    Also exhibited by:
    MAISON D'ART
  • Master of The Straus Madonna Straus

    Master of The Straus Madonna Straus

  • Paolo Veneziano

    Paolo Veneziano