MAISON D'ART

Stand:   365

Old master and Modern paintings

MAISON D'ART
PARK PALACE - 27 avenue de la Costa
98000 Monte-Carlo
Monaco
T  +37797971160
F  +37797971161
maison-dart@oldmasters.com
www.oldmasters.com

Gallery Information

  • Marietta Vinci-Corsini Director Maison d'Art
  • Elena Ishukova Assistant
  • Ekaterina Dolgova Director Modern Art
  • Olga Ismailova Assistant

Maison d’Art Gallery specializes in Important Old Master and Modern paintings.
Since its foundation in 1997, Maison d’Art has helped many private collectors and museums to acquire valuable works of art. Today the gallery intends to continue to engage in the art of the old masters and to expand the direction of its activities, working on interesting projects involving Impressionist, Modern and Contemporary art

Artists Exhibited at the fair:

  • Marcantonio Bassetti

    Marcantonio Bassetti

  • Paris Bordone

    Paris Bordone

  • Giulio Carpioni

    Giulio Carpioni

    Other Dealers:
    Also exhibited by:
    Galerie Canesso
  • Bartolomeo Cavarozzi

    Bartolomeo Cavarozzi

  • Salvador Dali

    Salvador Dali

    Artist's Objects: Other Dealers:
    Also exhibited by:
    Michele Beiny Inc.
    Waterhouse & Dodd
    Alon Zakaim Fine Art
    Galerie Michel Descours
  • Salvador Dalí

    Salvador Dalí

    Other Dealers:
    Also exhibited by:
    W&K-Wienerroither & Kohlbacher
  • Juan de Espinosa

    Juan de Espinosa

    Biography : Other Dealers:
    Also exhibited by:
    Galeria Caylus
  • JUSEPE DE RIBERA

    JUSEPE DE RIBERA

    Other Dealers:
    Also exhibited by:
    Adam Williams Fine Art Ltd
  • Jusepe De Ribera (Lo Spagnoletto)

    Jusepe De Ribera (Lo Spagnoletto)

    Biography : The artist appears to have been trained in the workshop of Ribalta in Valencia, and recent hypotheses suggest he left the Spanish city aged fifteen (in 1607/1608), bound for Italy. He must have soon met with success given that in 1611 an important patron such as Ranuccio Farnese could commission him to paint a Saint Martin Sharing His Cloak with a Beggar (untraced). In Rome, where he is documented as resident by 1615, he was in contact with the Northern followers of Caravaggio and probably became a member of the Accademia di San Luca. It was during this period (1614¬1615) that Ribera painted one of his greatest masterpie¬ces, the figures representing the Five Senses, cited by his biographer Mancini. In 1616 he is documented in Naples, where he no doubt settled in conjunction with the appointment of the Duke of Osuna as Viceroy there that year. Osuna was his pro¬tector in the official circles of Naples and commissioned a series of paintings of clear Caravaggesque derivation; these have survived in the Collegiate Church in Osuna itself. During the first half of the 1620s Ribera applied himself to engraving in Naples and Rome. In the Papal City he was able to renew his admiration for the great masters of the Renaissance, to whom he was always indebted in his search for rigorous and monumental compositions. His close connection with the culture of the Northern caravaggisti led him initially towards a manner of pronounced and sometimes brutal natura¬lism, but he gradually evolved from strong expressive accents to smoother, more relaxed handling, less cha¬racterized by touches of tenebrismo - all this the result of a more considered reflection on the Classics, and at the same time as the new Venetian influence was making itself felt in Roman circles. His palette became lighter and his brushstrokes more free, as revealed by numerous paintings, particularly those with mythological subjects, executed in the 1630s (see, for example, the Apollo and Marsyas in the Museo d Exhibition : The artist appears to have been trained in the workshop of Ribalta in Valencia, and recent hypotheses suggest he left the Spanish city aged fifteen (in 1607/1608), bound for Italy. He must have soon met with success given that in 1611 an important patron such as Ranuccio Farnese could commission him to paint a Saint Martin Sharing His Cloak with a Beggar (untraced). In Rome, where he is documented as resident by 1615, he was in contact with the Northern followers of Caravaggio and probably became a member of the Accademia di San Luca. It was during this period (1614¬1615) that Ribera painted one of his greatest masterpie¬ces, the figures representing the Five Senses, cited by his biographer Mancini.
    In 1616 he is documented in Naples, where he no doubt settled in conjunction with the appointment of the Duke of Osuna as Viceroy there that year. Osuna was his pro¬tector in the official circles of Naples and commissioned a series of paintings of clear Caravaggesque derivation; these have survived in the Collegiate Church in Osuna itself. During the first half of the 1620s Ribera applied himself to engraving in Naples and Rome. In the Papal City he was able to renew his admiration for the great masters of the Renaissance, to whom he was always indebted in his search for rigorous and monumental compositions. His close connection with the culture of the Northern caravaggisti led him initially towards a manner of pronounced and sometimes brutal natura¬lism, but he gradually evolved from strong expressive accents to smoother, more relaxed handling, less cha¬racterized by touches of tenebrismo - all this the result of a more considered reflection on the Classics, and at the same time as the new Venetian influence was making itself felt in Roman circles. His palette became lighter and his brushstrokes more free, as revealed by numerous paintings, particularly those with mythological subjects, executed in the 1630s (see, for example, the Apollo and Marsyas in the Museo d
  • Giovanni Domenico Ferretti

    Giovanni Domenico Ferretti

    Biography : The earliest formation of Giovan Domenico Ferretti occurred in Imola and Florence where he frequented the workshops of Tommaso Redi and Sebastiano Galeotti, and then in Bologna with Felice Torelli (1710 to 1714). The expansiveness of the Bolognese style resurfaces continually in the creative development of the artist characterizing his scenographic compositions and the vibrantly energetic anatomy and musculature of his figures. He was admired and in demand by patrons, above all for his quality of freshness. The influence of Ferretti's art was felt in Florence, Siena (1745), Pisa, and Pistoia: in the decoration of the Church of San Prospero and San Filippo, Pistoia (1735-45), and in the frescoes in the Church of the Carmine, Florence, which occupied the artist in the 1750's, perhaps constituting his masterpiece though almost totally destroyed. Known and loved especially for his whimsical and unconventional manner, in the latter years he reverted to a partial classicism based on the examples of Trevisani and Giaquinto. Ferretti, however, never abandoned the manner of joining the satirical and playful tendencies of his caricatures which, at times, did not exclude even the representation of figures in religious scenes. Exhibition : The earliest formation of Giovan Domenico Ferretti occurred in Imola and Florence where he frequented the workshops of Tommaso Redi and Sebastiano Galeotti, and then in Bologna with Felice Torelli (1710 to 1714). The expansiveness of the Bolognese style resurfaces continually in the creative development of the artist characterizing his scenographic compositions and the vibrantly energetic anatomy and musculature of his figures. He was admired and in demand by patrons, above all for his quality of freshness. The influence of Ferretti's art was felt in Florence, Siena (1745), Pisa, and Pistoia: in the decoration of the Church of San Prospero and San Filippo, Pistoia (1735-45), and in the frescoes in the Church of the Carmine, Florence, which occupied the artist in the 1750's, perhaps constituting his masterpiece though almost totally destroyed. Known and loved especially for his whimsical and unconventional manner, in the latter years he reverted to a partial classicism based on the examples of Trevisani and Giaquinto. Ferretti, however, never abandoned the manner of joining the satirical and playful tendencies of his caricatures which, at times, did not exclude even the representation of figures in religious scenes. Detailed Description : In the picture presented here, datable to ca. 1745, one can see the strong sculptural presence of the nude, the desire for dramatic effects, and the warm luminosity that animates the figures which derive from elements in Venetian painting, particularly Sebastiano Ricci. Perhaps such Venetian treatment of light was indirectly transmitted by his Emilian masters. Mindful of the teachings of Giuseppe Maria Crespi, the warm timbre and sfumato of the colors contribute to this most admired phase of Ferretti, creating figures which function within a firm compositional control, appearing almost sculpted in wax. The same model is used for the figure of Abel found, among others, in Jason with the Golden Fleece and in the Triumph of Hercules in the Palazzo Chigi-Sansedoni, both datable to 1745. The figure of God in God Reproving Cain is very close to that of Moses in the picture of Moses with the Bronze Serpent (Private Collection), a work similar in composition to the picture presented here. Signed and dated 1736, the Moses with the Bronze Serpent reveals, above all, a picture evolving in the direction of the style adopted in the God Reproving Cain for the Murder of Abel which appears clearly later and is relatedto the manner of the decoration of the Palazzo Chigi-Sansedoni in Siena. Other Dealers:
    Also exhibited by:
    Galerie Canesso
  • Giovanni Domenico Ferretti

    Giovanni Domenico Ferretti

    Biography : The earliest formation of Giovan Domenico Ferretti occurred in Imola and Florence where he frequented the workshops of Tommaso Redi and Sebastiano Galeotti, and then in Bologna with Felice Torelli (1710 to 1714). The expansiveness of the Bolognese style resurfaces continually in the creative development of the artist characterizing his scenographic compositions and the vibrantly energetic anatomy and musculature of his figures. He was admired and in demand by patrons, above all for his quality of freshness. The influence of Ferretti's art was felt in Florence, Siena (1745), Pisa, and Pistoia: in the decoration of the Church of San Prospero and San Filippo, Pistoia (1735-45), and in the frescoes in the Church of the Carmine, Florence, which occupied the artist in the 1750's, perhaps constituting his masterpiece though almost totally destroyed. Known and loved especially for his whimsical and unconventional manner, in the latter years he reverted to a partial classicism based on the examples of Trevisani and Giaquinto. Ferretti, however, never abandoned the manner of joining the satirical and playful tendencies of his caricatures which, at times, did not exclude even the representation of figures in religious scenes. Exhibition : The earliest formation of Giovan Domenico Ferretti occurred in Imola and Florence where he frequented the workshops of Tommaso Redi and Sebastiano Galeotti, and then in Bologna with Felice Torelli (1710 to 1714). The expansiveness of the Bolognese style resurfaces continually in the creative development of the artist characterizing his scenographic compositions and the vibrantly energetic anatomy and musculature of his figures. He was admired and in demand by patrons, above all for his quality of freshness. The influence of Ferretti's art was felt in Florence, Siena (1745), Pisa, and Pistoia: in the decoration of the Church of San Prospero and San Filippo, Pistoia (1735-45), and in the frescoes in the Church of the Carmine, Florence, which occupied the artist in the 1750's, perhaps constituting his masterpiece though almost totally destroyed. Known and loved especially for his whimsical and unconventional manner, in the latter years he reverted to a partial classicism based on the examples of Trevisani and Giaquinto. Ferretti, however, never abandoned the manner of joining the satirical and playful tendencies of his caricatures which, at times, did not exclude even the representation of figures in religious scenes. Other Dealers:
    Also exhibited by:
    Galerie Canesso
  • Giovanni Domenico Ferretti

    Giovanni Domenico Ferretti

    Other Dealers:
    Also exhibited by:
    Galerie Canesso
  • Giuseppe Vittore Ghislandi detto Fra’ Galgario

    Giuseppe Vittore Ghislandi detto Fra’ Galgario

  • Jean-Honoré Fragonard

    Jean-Honoré Fragonard

    Other Dealers:
    Also exhibited by:
    Galerie Eric Coatalem
  • Marco Antonio Franceschini

    Marco Antonio Franceschini

  • Vittore Ghislandi, called Fra’Galgario

    Vittore Ghislandi, called Fra’Galgario

    Biography : Other Dealers:
    Also exhibited by:
    G. Sarti
    Galerie Canesso
  • Fernand Léger

    Fernand Léger

  • Giovanni Pellegrini

    Giovanni Pellegrini

  • GUIDO RENI

    GUIDO RENI

    Artist's Objects:
  • Johan (Giovanni) Richter

    Johan (Giovanni) Richter

    Other Dealers:
    Also exhibited by:
    Charles Beddington Ltd.
  • Peter Paul Rubens

    Peter Paul Rubens

  • Giovan Battista Salvi called il Sassoferrato

    Giovan Battista Salvi called il Sassoferrato

    Also represented by:
    Altomani & Sons srl
  • Giovan Battista Salvi called il Sassoferrato

    Giovan Battista Salvi called il Sassoferrato

    Also represented by:
    Altomani & Sons srl
  • di Tito Santi

    di Tito Santi

  • GIOVANNI GEROLAMO SAVOLDO

    GIOVANNI GEROLAMO SAVOLDO

    Biography : Savoldo was a member of the important early sixteenth-century Brescian school which included Romanino and Moretto da Brescia. The earliest certain documentary record occurs only in 1506, when Savoldo, already in his mid-20s, is recorded as "master" in Parma. Two years later, in 1508, he was inscribed in the Arte dei medici e degli speciali in Florence. The Holy Hermits (Venice, Galleria dell'Accademia, signed and dated 1520, Valcanover, 1985) is the earliest securely dated work by Savoldo, and it is related to the Prophet Elijah (Washington, National Gallery). In 1521 Savoldo was called to complete the monumental Madonna and Child with Saints in the Church of San Niccolo in Treviso. Beginning at this time, the artist is recorded frequently in Venice, which had a decisive influence on the evolution of his style. In 1524 Savoldo contracted for the Madonna and Child in Glory with Saints (Milan, Brera) for the Church of San Domenico in Pesaro. From the mid-1520s also dates the Tobias and the Archangel (Rome, Galleria Borghese) and the half-length Magdalen (London, National Gallery) in which a Venetian treatment of light is combined with an inherent Lombard tendency to finely realized naturalistic detail. The Portrait of a Warrior (Paris, Louvre) marks the increasing inventiveness of Savoldo's work by the early 1530s. In 1533 he completed the Madonna and Child in Glory with Saints for the Church of Santa Maria in Organo in Verona. The Saint Matthew and the Angel (New York, Metropolitan Museum of Art) dates from the mid-1530s. According to Vasari (ed. Milanesi, vol. 6, p. 507), many of Savoldo's works were to be seen in Venice as well as Milan, where he was working for Duke Francesco II Sforza probably during the early or mid 1530s. The Aretine biographer emphasized Savoldo's night scenes illuminated by fire. Savoldo was married to a Flemish woman, which may, in part, account for the striking influence of Flemish pictures, especially in the earlier work of Sa Exhibition : Savoldo was a member of the important early sixteenth-century Brescian school which included Romanino and Moretto da Brescia. The earliest certain documentary record occurs only in 1506, when Savoldo, already in his mid-20s, is recorded as "master" in Parma. Two years later, in 1508, he was inscribed in the Arte dei medici e degli speciali in Florence. The Holy Hermits (Venice, Galleria dell'Accademia, signed and dated 1520, Valcanover, 1985) is the earliest securely dated work by Savoldo, and it is related to the Prophet Elijah (Washington, National Gallery). In 1521 Savoldo was called to complete the monumental Madonna and Child with Saints in the Church of San Niccolo in Treviso. Beginning at this time, the artist is recorded frequently in Venice, which had a decisive influence on the evolution of his style. In 1524 Savoldo contracted for the Madonna and Child in Glory with Saints (Milan, Brera) for the Church of San Domenico in Pesaro. From the mid-1520s also dates the Tobias and the Archangel (Rome, Galleria Borghese) and the half-length Magdalen (London, National Gallery) in which a Venetian treatment of light is combined with an inherent Lombard tendency to finely realized naturalistic detail. The Portrait of a Warrior (Paris, Louvre) marks the increasing inventiveness of Savoldo's work by the early 1530s. In 1533 he completed the Madonna and Child in Glory with Saints for the Church of Santa Maria in Organo in Verona. The Saint Matthew and the Angel (New York, Metropolitan Museum of Art) dates from the mid-1530s. According to Vasari (ed. Milanesi, vol. 6, p. 507), many of Savoldo's works were to be seen in Venice as well as Milan, where he was working for Duke Francesco II Sforza probably during the early or mid 1530s. The Aretine biographer emphasized Savoldo's night scenes illuminated by fire. Savoldo was married to a Flemish woman, which may, in part, account for the striking influence of Flemish pictures, especially in the earlier work of Sa Other Dealers:
    Also exhibited by:
    Moretti
  • EGON SCHIELE

    EGON SCHIELE

  • Matthias Stomer

    Matthias Stomer

    Biography : Firm documentation concerning the activity of the Dutch artist Matthias Stomer is scarce. He was born around 1600 in the town of Amersfoort and died after 1650 in Sicily. According to a document in the Archive of the Church of S. Nicola, Rome, Stomer was working there from 1630-32. He is also noted as living with the French artist Niccolo Provo on the Strada dell'Olmo in the 1630's. In 1631 and again from 1633 to 1639, Stomer is believed to have been in Naples, where he came into contact with the leading artists of the city. He left Naples for Sicily two years later. His name appears in 1641 on the signed and dated altarpiece in the church of S. Isidoro Agricola at Caccamo near Palermo. There are but two significant paintings signed by Stomer, and the S. Isidoro altarpiece is the only dated example. While in Messina, Stomer worked for the Capuchins and for Antonio Ruffo. The inventories of the Ruffo Collection in Messina list five works by "Mattheo Stom Fiammingo," who is described as from "from Palermo," and "a pupil of Honthorst." In tracing the northern sources of his art, it is presumed that Stomer had been in Utrecht studying with Honthorst, for there are noticeable stylistic affinities with this master. South Netherlandish strains can also be discerned in Stomer's figure types, and it is possible that he worked with Abraham Janssens in Antwerp. Prof. L.J. Slatkes has pointed out that this Annunciation dates from the 1630's and therefore is a work from the artist's Neapolitan period. The detail of the block form of text in the open Bible is typical, he notes, of Stomer's compositions in that decade. The cool coloring reflects the influence of his Neapolitan contemporary, Cavallino, as represented in his Adoration of the Shepherds (Cleveland Museum of Art). Exhibition : Firm documentation concerning the activity of the Dutch artist Matthias Stomer is scarce. He was born around 1600 in the town of Amersfoort and died after 1650 in Sicily. According to a document in the Archive of the Church of S. Nicola, Rome, Stomer was working there from 1630-32. He is also noted as living with the French artist Niccolo Provo on the Strada dell'Olmo in the 1630's. In 1631 and again from 1633 to 1639, Stomer is believed to have been in Naples, where he came into contact with the leading artists of the city. He left Naples for Sicily two years later. His name appears in 1641 on the signed and dated altarpiece in the church of S. Isidoro Agricola at Caccamo near Palermo. There are but two significant paintings signed by Stomer, and the S. Isidoro altarpiece is the only dated example. While in Messina, Stomer worked for the Capuchins and for Antonio Ruffo. The inventories of the Ruffo Collection in Messina list five works by "Mattheo Stom Fiammingo," who is described as from "from Palermo," and "a pupil of Honthorst."

    In tracing the northern sources of his art, it is presumed that Stomer had been in Utrecht studying with Honthorst, for there are noticeable stylistic affinities with this master. South Netherlandish strains can also be discerned in Stomer's figure types, and it is possible that he worked with Abraham Janssens in Antwerp. Prof. L.J. Slatkes has pointed out that this Annunciation dates from the 1630's and therefore is a work from the artist's Neapolitan period. The detail of the block form of text in the open Bible is typical, he notes, of Stomer's compositions in that decade. The cool coloring reflects the influence of his Neapolitan contemporary, Cavallino, as represented in his Adoration of the Shepherds (Cleveland Museum of Art).
    Detailed Description : The Annunciation, Oil on canvas, 104,8 x 145 cm. In the Annunciation, the three-quarter length figures fill the canvas to create an arrangement of arresting simplicity. The composition is closely related to another Annunciation by Stomer, also dated ca. 1630-1632, in Vienna (Kunsthistorisches Museum). The Corsini picture elicits a quieter, more contemplative tone than the Vienna canvas which reflects a greater emphasis on the swift movement of Gabriel as he appears before the Virgin. Both pictures are characteristic of Stomer's earlier Neapolitan phase. During his later Sicilian period, Stomer's compositions became more complex, and he shows a strong predilection for dramatic night scenes. According to the writings of St. Bernard, while the Virgin was reading the prophecy of Isaiah, she was interrupted by the angel Gabriel who announced God's message, "You shall give him the name, Jesus." The Annunciation traditionally tales places in the Virgin's bedchamber, indicated here by the horizontal swath of green drapery. The Annunciation demonstrates Stomer's grand and lyrical sense of drama, contrasting the rich exuberance of the angel with the restraint of the Virgin, whose quiet gesture expresses humility and submission. This hitherto unknown composition, a rare and important example of Stomer's Neapolitan period, is a discovery of extraordinary quality and beauty. Recently, the Annunciation was found fortuitously. It had been completely overpainted as a vertical 19th century English portrait. The portrait was hanging in an English private collection and, when sent to be restored, the Stomer was uncovered.
  • Domenikos Theotocopoulos (El Greco)

    Domenikos Theotocopoulos (El Greco)

    Biography : El Greco was born into a family belonging to the Catholic minority on the island of Crete, at that time under Venetian dominion. In December 1566 he is recorded in Candia as receiving official authorization to sell by lottery a Passion of Christ - possibly an Ecce Homo - painted on gold ground. In December 1567 he is documented in Venice as a member of the workshop of Titian, who refers to him as a pupil in a letter to Philip II of Spain. Learning from the great master, who was now in the last years of his long career, he was able to abandon his early manner, steeped in the codified lan¬guage of Greco-Byzantine art and marked by strong for¬mal abstraction, and to enrich his style through a keen and passionately dedicated observation of nature. His initial Venetian period certainly includes the important triptych in the Galleria Estense, Modena close to the Last Supper in the Pinacoteca Nazionale, Bologna. The paintings of El Greco's early Venetian years fre¬quently display an awareness of the Northern Mannerist tradition, which he would have known through prints. Aged almost thirty, he moved to Rome in 1570 with a recommendation from the Croatian painter Giulio Clovio to Cardinal Alessandro Farnese (he is referred to as a "young Candiot pupil of Titian") and remained there for about five years, frequenting - in the words of the bio¬grapher Giulio Mancini - artists such as "Muciano [Girolamo Muziano], Taddeo Zuccari, iI Sermoneta [Girolamo Siciolante]". The works of these Roman years, including the Portrait of Giulio Clovio and Boy Blowing Out a Candle, both in the Capodimonte Museum, Naples, evince a close adherence to the Italian maniera, aptly complementing the intellectual side of his earliest training in Greece. On 18 July 1572 he is docu¬mented at work in the Palazzo Farnese at Caprarola. In 1575 he moved to Spain and he settled in Toledo, where he is documented with certainty in June 1577, when he received the important commission for the entire deco¬rat Exhibition : El Greco was born into a family belonging to the Catholic minority on the island of Crete, at that time under Venetian dominion. In December 1566 he is recorded in Candia as receiving official authorization to sell by lottery a Passion of Christ - possibly an Ecce Homo - painted on gold ground. In December 1567 he is documented in Venice as a member of the workshop of Titian, who refers to him as a pupil in a letter to Philip II of Spain. Learning from the great master, who was now in the last years of his long career, he was able to abandon his early manner, steeped in the codified lan¬guage of Greco-Byzantine art and marked by strong for¬mal abstraction, and to enrich his style through a keen and passionately dedicated observation of nature. His initial Venetian period certainly includes the important triptych in the Galleria Estense, Modena close to the Last Supper in the Pinacoteca Nazionale, Bologna. The paintings of El Greco's early Venetian years fre¬quently display an awareness of the Northern Mannerist tradition, which he would have known through prints. Aged almost thirty, he moved to Rome in 1570 with a recommendation from the Croatian painter Giulio Clovio to Cardinal Alessandro Farnese (he is referred to as a "young Candiot pupil of Titian") and remained there for about five years, frequenting - in the words of the bio¬grapher Giulio Mancini - artists such as "Muciano [Girolamo Muziano], Taddeo Zuccari, iI Sermoneta [Girolamo Siciolante]". The works of these Roman years, including the Portrait of Giulio Clovio and Boy Blowing Out a Candle, both in the Capodimonte Museum, Naples, evince a close adherence to the Italian maniera, aptly complementing the intellectual side of his earliest training in Greece. On 18 July 1572 he is docu¬mented at work in the Palazzo Farnese at Caprarola. In 1575 he moved to Spain and he settled in Toledo, where he is documented with certainty in June 1577, when he received the important commission for the entire deco¬rat
  • Jan van Noort

    Jan van Noort