Joan Wijermars

Stand:   150

19th- and 20th-century sculpture

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info@wijermars.com
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Gallery Information

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Artists Exhibited at the fair:

  • Giovanni Guiseppe Albertoni

    Giovanni Guiseppe Albertoni

  • Antoine-Louis Barye

    Antoine-Louis Barye

    Biography : Born in Paris, Barye began his career as a goldsmith, like many sculptors of the Romantic Period. After studying under sculptor Francois-Joseph Bosio and painter Baron Antoine-Jean Gros he was in 1818 admitted to the École des Beaux Arts. But it was not until 1823, while working for Fauconnier, the goldsmith, that he discovered his true predilection from watching the wild beasts in the Jardin des Plantes, making vigorous studies of them in pencil drawings comparable to those of Delacroix, then modelling them in sculpture on a large or small scale. In 1831 he exhibited his "Tiger devouring a Crocodile", and in 1832 had mastered a style of his own in the "Lion and Snake." Thenceforward Barye, though engaged in a perpetual struggle with want, exhibited year after year these studies of animals, admirable groups which reveal him as inspired by a spirit of true romance and a feeling for the beauty of the antique, as in "Theseus and the Minotaur" (1847), "Lapitha and Centaur" (1848), and numerous minor works now very highly valued. Barye was no less successful in sculpture on a small scale, and excelled in representing animals in their most familiar attitudes. Examples of his larger work include the "Lion of the Column of July," of which the plaster model was cast in 1839, various lions and tigers in the gardens of the Tuileries, and the four groups--"War, Peace, Strength, and Order" (1854). In 1852 he cast his bronze "Jaguar devouring a Hare." Fame came late in the sculptor's life. He was made Professor of Drawings at the Museum of Natural History in 1854, and was elected to the Academy of Fine Arts in 1868. No new works were produced by Barye after 1869. The mass of admirable work left by Barye entitles him to be regarded as one of the great animal life artists of the French school, and the refiner of a class of art which has attracted such men as Emmanuel Frémiet, Peter, Cain, and Gardet. Other Dealers:
    Also exhibited by:
    Daniel Katz Ltd
  • Antoine-Louis Barye

    Antoine-Louis Barye

    Biography : Born in Paris, Barye began his career as a goldsmith, like many sculptors of the Romantic Period. After studying under sculptor Francois-Joseph Bosio and painter Baron Antoine-Jean Gros he was in 1818 admitted to the École des Beaux Arts. But it was not until 1823, while working for Fauconnier, the goldsmith, that he discovered his true predilection from watching the wild beasts in the Jardin des Plantes, making vigorous studies of them in pencil drawings comparable to those of Delacroix, then modelling them in sculpture on a large or small scale. In 1831 he exhibited his "Tiger devouring a Crocodile", and in 1832 had mastered a style of his own in the "Lion and Snake." Thenceforward Barye, though engaged in a perpetual struggle with want, exhibited year after year these studies of animals, admirable groups which reveal him as inspired by a spirit of true romance and a feeling for the beauty of the antique, as in "Theseus and the Minotaur" (1847), "Lapitha and Centaur" (1848), and numerous minor works now very highly valued. Barye was no less successful in sculpture on a small scale, and excelled in representing animals in their most familiar attitudes. Examples of his larger work include the "Lion of the Column of July," of which the plaster model was cast in 1839, various lions and tigers in the gardens of the Tuileries, and the four groups--"War, Peace, Strength, and Order" (1854). In 1852 he cast his bronze "Jaguar devouring a Hare." Fame came late in the sculptor's life. He was made Professor of Drawings at the Museum of Natural History in 1854, and was elected to the Academy of Fine Arts in 1868. No new works were produced by Barye after 1869. The mass of admirable work left by Barye entitles him to be regarded as one of the great animal life artists of the French school, and the refiner of a class of art which has attracted such men as Emmanuel Frémiet, Peter, Cain, and Gardet. Other Dealers:
    Also exhibited by:
    Daniel Katz Ltd
  • Antoine-Louis BARYE

    Antoine-Louis BARYE

    Other Dealers:
    Also exhibited by:
    Bowman Sculpture
  • Giovanni Maria Benzoni

    Giovanni Maria Benzoni

  • Alfred Boucher

    Alfred Boucher

    Biography : Alfred Boucher (B. 1850, D. 1934) French. He recieved his first lessons in sculpture at Nogentsur-Siene by Marius Ramus. He entered the Ecole des Beaux-Arts of Paris in 1869. All of Boucher's works stand out for their natural quality and their highly developed expressions and movements. One of his best-known and most reproduced work is "Au But!" (1887) Depicting three athletes and Vaincre ou mourir, a work in plaster of the group crowning the monument to children of the Dawn at Troyes (1887) Exhibition : Alfred Boucher (B. 1850, D. 1934) French. He recieved his first lessons in sculpture at Nogentsur-Siene by Marius Ramus. He entered the Ecole des Beaux-Arts of Paris in 1869. All of Boucher's works stand out for their natural quality and their highly developed expressions and movements. One of his best-known and most reproduced work is "Au But!" (1887) Depicting three athletes and Vaincre ou mourir, a work in plaster of the group crowning the monument to children of the Dawn at Troyes (1887) Detailed Description : "To The Goal", by Alfred Boucher. In patinated bronze, signed A. Boucher in the maquette, stamped foundry mark SIOT PARIS and 435J. 17 3/4"High
  • Antonio Canova

    Antonio Canova

    Artist's Objects: Other Dealers:
    Also exhibited by:
    Royal-Athena Galleries
  • Otto Eerelman

    Otto Eerelman

    Other Dealers:
    Also exhibited by:
    Kunsthandel A.H. Bies
    Also represented by:
    Daatselaar Fine Art | Antiques
  • Jean Escoula

    Jean Escoula

  • Vincenzo Gemito

    Vincenzo Gemito

    Artist's Objects: Other Dealers:
    Also exhibited by:
    Carlo Orsi
    Giacometti Old Master Paintings
  • Filippo Gnaccarini

    Filippo Gnaccarini

  • Jan Adam Kruseman

    Jan Adam Kruseman

  • Lawrence Macdonald

    Lawrence Macdonald

    Biography : Lawrence Macdonald (1799-1878) who became known as “The Scottish Canova” was born in Findo Gask in Scotland and was apprenticed to a local mason called Thomas Gibson. In 1822 he went to Edinburgh, where he entered the Trustee's Academy, and continued from there to Rome to became one of the founding members of the British Academy of Arts in the city. MacDonald was one of the most popular portrait sculptors of his day, working almost continuously in Rome from 1831 to his death. Numerous noble commissions of portraiture enabled Macdonald to pursue his favoured genre of ideal statuary. Exhibition : Lawrence Macdonald (1799-1878) who became known as “The Scottish Canova” was born in Findo Gask in Scotland and was apprenticed to a local mason called Thomas Gibson. In 1822 he went to Edinburgh, where he entered the Trustee's Academy, and continued from there to Rome to became one of the founding members of the British Academy of Arts in the city. MacDonald was one of the most popular portrait sculptors of his day, working almost continuously in Rome from 1831 to his death. Numerous noble commissions of portraiture enabled Macdonald to pursue his favoured genre of ideal statuary.
  • Lawrence MacDonald

    Lawrence MacDonald

    Biography : Lawrence Macdonald (1799-1878) who became known as “The Scottish Canova” was born in Findo Gask in Scotland and was apprenticed to a local mason called Thomas Gibson. In 1822 he went to Edinburgh, where he entered the Trustee's Academy, and continued from there to Rome to became one of the founding members of the British Academy of Arts in the city. MacDonald was one of the most popular portrait sculptors of his day, working almost continuously in Rome from 1831 to his death. Numerous noble commissions of portraiture enabled Macdonald to pursue his favoured genre of ideal statuary. Detailed Description : This exquisite statue of Hyacinthus was commissioned by John Gladstone (1764-1851) and is the first example of three variants of the subject known to be in existence. In 1852 Macdonald reproduced a version for Prince Albert which remains in the Royal Collection and is displayed in the Marble Hall at Buckingham Palace. It shows Hyacinthus without his chaplet and the tree stump draped with a robe. A third version shows Hyacinthus wearing sandals, as opposed to barefoot as in the present example and that in the Royal Collection, without his chaplet and with the tree stump draped. Hyacinthus was a beautiful young prince of Sparta, loved by the god Apollo. The two took turns throwing the discus, until Apollo, to impress his beloved, threw it with all his might. Hyacinthus who ran to catch it, to impress Apollo in turn, was struck on the head by the discus and died. The hyacinth flower is said to have first sprouted where his blood fell.
  • Lawrence MacDonald

    Lawrence MacDonald

    Biography : Lawrence MacDonald who became known as “The Scottish Canova” spent most of his working life in Rome. He was born at Bonnyview, Findo-Gask, Perthshire, on 15 February 1799, the son of Alexander MacDonald and Margaret, née Morison. His father was an impoverished, half-blind violinist, his mother a nurse. MacDonald was schooled in Gask and apprenticed to a local mason, Thomas Gibson. An early commission was for carved decorative work for Robert Graeme of Garvock House. P. R. Drummond, a local historian, met MacDonald in 1816 and subsequently wrote a long memoir of the sculptor. His impression was that the young man was ‘naturally somewhat impassioned and self-asserting’ (Drummond 1879, 112). MacDonald went to Edinburgh in 1822 and enrolled at the Trustees’ Academy. Whilst studying he also worked for the architect James Gillespie Graham as a decorative carver. That winter he left Scotland for France in the company of the Oliphant family of Gask. MacDonald and the young laird of Oliphant continued on to Rome, where MacDonald set up a studio in the Corso. He stayed for three years, becoming an early member of the British Academy of Arts in Rome (founded 1821) and attracting the patronage of Scottish visitors, such as the Duke of Atholl and Sir Evan McGregor. Scottish tourists apparently regarded the commissioning of a bust by MacDonald as ‘an indispensable corollary to a short stay in the city’ (Drummond 1879, 116). He returned to Edinburgh in 1826 and exhibited a number of works at the Institution for the Encouragement of the Fine Arts in Scotland (later to become the Scottish Academy). His exhibits included several busts of notable patrons and friends, and the statue of a Boy slinging, carved in Rome in 1823. In 1827 he succeeded Samuel Joseph as the most influential sculptor involved in the Edinburgh Phrenological Society. MacDonald carved a bust all’antica of its founder, George Combe , who acknowledged a great debt to Macdonald for directing his qu
  • Giacomo Manzù

    Giacomo Manzù

    Biography : The series of bronze and stone Cardinali that Manzù made between 1938 and his death are among the most celebrated works of the sculptor's oeuvre. A native of Bergamo, long a center of Catholic devotion, Manzù drew heavily on his childhood experiences in these sculptures. The priest who presided over the parish of Bergamo while Manzù was growing up would later become Pope John XXIII, and it was not uncommon to see cardinals and bishops processing through the town's streets. In 1934, at the age of twenty-six, Manzù was struck during a visit to Rome by the powerful sight of Pope Pius XI seated between two cardinals. He recorded the motif in a drawing dated the same year, and it became a recurrent theme of his work thereafter. By the time of his death in 1991, he had sculpted roughly three hundred Cardinali, both seated and standing, in a range of sizes. In all of these sculptures, the figure is almost fully enveloped in liturgical vestments, creating a stylized, pyramidal silhouette that extends from the hem of the robe to the tip of the mitre. Despite the subject matter, Manzù repeatedly insisted that the works had no religious or mystical significance. Instead, it was the forceful visual presence of the cardinals, particularly their distinctive garments, that captured the sculptor's attention; they represented, he claimed, "not the majesty of the church, but the majesty of form" (quoted in J. Rewald, Giacomo Manzù, London, 1967, p. 60). John Rewald, who interviewed Manzù at length, explains, When asked, the artist always stresses that the cardinals did not interest him as a typically religious theme but represented for him more the character of a still-life. He even likes to add that he might just as easily have represented matadors. There were, however, no bullfights in Bergamo, whereas the boy often met church dignitaries. Their visual impression became an inspiration for him, a problem of artistic creation which pursued him for years. For a long tim
  • Rafaelle Monti

    Rafaelle Monti

    Biography : Raffaello Monti studied sculpture with his father, Gaetano Monti of Ravenna, at the Imperial Academy. He made his debut early and won a Gold Medal for his group entitled Alexander Taming Bucephalus. He and other young sculptors soon became identified as belonging to the Scuola Lombarda, a group associated with a reaction against the severity of the neoclassicism that dominated Italian sculpture in the first half of the 19th century. After periods spent working successfully in Vienna and once again in Milan, he made his first visit to England in 1846, but returned to Italy in 1847 to join the Popular Party and became one of the chief officers of the National Guard. After the disastrous failure of the Risorgimento campaigns of 1848, he was forced to flee from Italy to England where he was to remain for the rest of his life. His career in England was extremely successful and prolific. The Great Exhibition of 1851 in Crystal Palace occurred only a few years after his arrival. At this landmark exhibition Monti exhibited his Eve, The Fisher Girls, A Circassian Slave in the Market-place at Constantinople, Angelica and Medoro, Innocence and the Vestal Virgin. While the Vestal received much popular acclaim, it was Eve which was awarded a prize medal by the exhibition's jury. Their verdict reported that the figure is 'appropriately conceived; the motive is pleasing, and the execution is very careful'. After his Eve, Monti's career was prodigious. His Circassian Slave and Vestal made his virtuoso carving of veiled figures in marble his trademark. This theme culminated in his statue of Night, exhibited at the International Exhibition of 1862, and reproduced in parian by Copeland, and his Berninian The Sleep of Sorrow and the Dream of Joy, now in the Victoria & Albert Museum. Exhibition : World Exhibition 1851, Crystal Palace London
  • Aguste Rodin

    Aguste Rodin

    Other Dealers:
    Also exhibited by:
    Bowman Sculpture
  • Victor Rousseau

    Victor Rousseau

  • Bertel Thorvaldsen

    Bertel Thorvaldsen

    Artist's Objects:
  • Richard James Wyatt

    Richard James Wyatt

    Biography : Richard James Wyatt was one of the first sculptors to arrive in the Eternal city after the Restauration. Now that the Napoleonic wars had ended Rome once again was the capital of artistic education. Son of woodcarver Edward Wyatt and cousin of sculptor Mathew Cotes Wyatt, Richard James first studied under John Charles Felix Rossi before attending the Royal Academy, where he first exhibited in 1818. At that time he already enjoyed the patronage of the painter Thomas Lawrence who, profiting from Canova’s visit to England in 1815, recommended Wyatt to the great sculptor. Canova offered him to work in his studio if he decided to come to Rome. After a short period in Paris under the master hood of François-Joseph Bosio, Wyatt came to Rome in 1821. He only enjoyed Canova’s directions for a short time because the latter left Rome a year later. Therefore he turned to Thorwaldsen who he found just as liberal: “He was like Canova, most liberal in his attentions to young artists, visiting all those who solicited his advice. I profited greatly by the knowledge which this splendid artist had of his art. On every occasion when a new work was modelled by me, he came to see it, and corrected such errors as were apparent to him … His studio was the resort of artists and lovers of art from all nations”. A little later Wyatt started his own studio where he worked hard to make name for himself. A few years later when he reached fame he was one of Rome’s most established sculptors, specializing in allegorical and female mythological figures. Gibson too witnessed this and confirmed that Wyatt: “acquired the purest style and his statues were highly finished. Female figures were his forte and he was clever in composition and the harmony of lines. No sculptor in England has produced female statues to be compared to those by Wyatt”. His works were in high demand by prestigious buyers, predominantly Anglo-Saxons, among who the fifth Duke of Devonshire, for who Exhibition : Richard James Wyatt was one of the first sculptors to arrive in the Eternal city after the Restauration. Now that the Napoleonic wars had ended Rome once again was the capital of artistic education. Son of woodcarver Edward Wyatt and cousin of sculptor Mathew Cotes Wyatt, Richard James first studied under John Charles Felix Rossi before attending the Royal Academy, where he first exhibited in 1818. At that time he already enjoyed the patronage of the painter Thomas Lawrence who, profiting from Canova’s visit to England in 1815, recommended Wyatt to the great sculptor. Canova offered him to work in his studio if he decided to come to Rome. After a short period in Paris under the master hood of François-Joseph Bosio, Wyatt came to Rome in 1821. He only enjoyed Canova’s directions for a short time because the latter left Rome a year later. Therefore he turned to Thorwaldsen who he found just as liberal:

    “He was like Canova, most liberal in his attentions to young artists, visiting all those who solicited his advice. I profited greatly by the knowledge which this splendid artist had of his art. On every occasion when a new work was modelled by me, he came to see it, and corrected such errors as were apparent to him … His studio was the resort of artists and lovers of art from all nations”.

    A little later Wyatt started his own studio where he worked hard to make name for himself. A few years later when he reached fame he was one of Rome’s most established sculptors, specializing in allegorical and female mythological figures. Gibson too witnessed this and confirmed that Wyatt: “acquired the purest style and his statues were highly finished. Female figures were his forte and he was clever in composition and the harmony of lines. No sculptor in England has produced female statues to be compared to those by Wyatt”.

    His works were in high demand by prestigious buyers, predominantly Anglo-Saxons, among who the fifth Duke of Devonshire, for who
  • Richard Wyatt

    Richard Wyatt

    Biography : Richard James Wyatt was one of the first sculptors to arrive in the Eternal city after the Restauration. Now that the Napoleonic wars had ended Rome once again was the capital of artistic education. Son of woodcarver Edward Wyatt and cousin of sculptor Mathew Cotes Wyatt, Richard James first studied under John Charles Felix Rossi before attending the Royal Academy, where he first exhibited in 1818. At that time he already enjoyed the patronage of the painter Thomas Lawrence who, profiting from Canova’s visit to England in 1815, recommended Wyatt to the great sculptor. Canova offered him to work in his studio if he decided to come to Rome. After a short period in Paris under the master hood of François-Joseph Bosio, Wyatt came to Rome in 1821. He only enjoyed Canova’s directions for a short time because the latter left Rome a year later. Therefore he turned to Thorwaldsen who he found just as liberal: “He was like Canova, most liberal in his attentions to young artists, visiting all those who solicited his advice. I profited greatly by the knowledge which this splendid artist had of his art. On every occasion when a new work was modelled by me, he came to see it, and corrected such errors as were apparent to him … His studio was the resort of artists and lovers of art from all nations”. A little later Wyatt started his own studio where he worked hard to make name for himself. A few years later when he reached fame he was one of Rome’s most established sculptors, specializing in allegorical and female mythological figures. Gibson too witnessed this and confirmed that Wyatt: “acquired the purest style and his statues were highly finished. Female figures were his forte and he was clever in composition and the harmony of lines. No sculptor in England has produced female statues to be compared to those by Wyatt”. His works were in high demand by prestigious buyers, predominantly Anglo-Saxons, among who the fifth Duke of Devonshire, for whom