Hammer Galleries

Stand:   445

Specializing in Nineteenth & Twentieth Century European and American Masters

Hammer Galleries
32 East 67th Street
New York, New York 10065
United States
T  +1 212 644 4400
M   +1 954 242 3535
info@hammergalleries.com
www.hammergalleries.com

Gallery Information

  • Howard Shaw President and Director
  • Stephanie Tarras Associate Director, Contact Person

Founded in 1928 by industrialist and philanthropist Dr. Armand Hammer, Hammer Galleries is among the oldest galleries in New York City. The gallery quickly rose to prominence when, in the early 1930s, it exhibited the world-famous Russian Imperial Easter Eggs by celebrated court jeweler Karl Fabergé. After beginning with a primary focus on Russian icons, Imperial porcelains and rare art objects, in the 1960’s Hammer shifted its focus to 19th and 20th century European and American artists.

In 2010, Hammer Galleries moved to new premises at 475 Park Avenue, New York. Hammer's change in location was accompanied by an expansion of its focus. Major recent exhibitions include: "Modern Masters: Paris and Beyond", "On Paper: Works by Impressionist, Modern and Post-War Masters", "Objects in Space: Léger, Miró, Calder", "The Modern Muse: Paintings, Drawings and Sculpture by Twentieth-Century Masters", and "Matisse & Picasso", all of which have been accompanied by full-color catalogs with scholarly and biographical essays.

As of September 2015, the gallery has relocated to the beautiful Didier Aaron townhouse at 32 East 67th Street in the Upper East Side Historic District. Hammer continues to concentrate on Impressionist and Modern masters, while now also handling important works by Post-War masters. Howard Shaw, who began his career at Hammer Galleries in 1981, is the current President and Director.

Artists Exhibited at the fair:

  • Marc Chagall
  • William Merritt CHASE

    William Merritt CHASE

  • Paul-César Helleu

    Paul-César Helleu

    Other Dealers:
    Also exhibited by:
    Stoppenbach & Delestre Ltd.
  • Wassily Kandinsky

    Wassily Kandinsky

    Artist's Objects: Other Dealers:
    Also exhibited by:
    Galerie Thomas
    W&K-Wienerroither & Kohlbacher
    Alon Zakaim Fine Art
    Also represented by:
    Daxer & Marschall Kunsthandel
  • Fernand Léger

    Fernand Léger

  • Henri Matisse
  • Joan Miró

    Joan Miró

    Artist's Objects: Other Dealers:
    Also exhibited by:
    W&K-Wienerroither & Kohlbacher
    Galerie Haas AG
  • Amedeo Modigliani

    Amedeo Modigliani

    Detailed Description : Portrait of Jeanne Hetenval signed Modigliani in the lower left pencil and charcoal on paper 405 x 262 mm Other Dealers:
    Also exhibited by:
    Lawrence Steigrad Fine Arts
    Galerie Thomas
  • Berthe Morisot

    Berthe Morisot

    Other Dealers:
    Also exhibited by:
    Richard Green
    Galerie Hopkins
  • Berthe Morisot

    Berthe Morisot

    Other Dealers:
    Also exhibited by:
    Richard Green
    Galerie Hopkins
  • Berthe Morisot

    Berthe Morisot

    Other Dealers:
    Also exhibited by:
    Richard Green
    Galerie Hopkins
  • Berthe Morisot

    Berthe Morisot

    Other Dealers:
    Also exhibited by:
    Richard Green
    Galerie Hopkins
  • Berthe Morisot

    Berthe Morisot

    Other Dealers:
    Also exhibited by:
    Richard Green
    Galerie Hopkins
  • Grandma Moses

    Grandma Moses

  • Pablo Picasso
  • Léon POURTAU

    Léon POURTAU

  • Léon Pourtau

    Léon Pourtau

  • Léon, POURTAU

    Léon, POURTAU

    Biography : One of a very small number of Pourtau’s known works, the present painting exemplifies his use of the pointillist technique made famous by his friend Georges Seurat (1959 – 1891). Though much remains to be learned about Pourtau’s life and career, he was a highly accomplished professional musician who spent several years in the United States hoping to earn enough to be able to devote himself exclusively to painting upon returning to France.1 Tragically, he died before his 30th birthday when La Bourgogne, the steamship carrying him back to France, sank off the coast of Sable Island, killing over 500 passengers and crew.2 Apparently Pourtau never exhibited his work, though accounts of his time with the Boston Symphony identify him as “a painter of charming pictures,” suggesting his talents were widely known.3 A group of works remained within Pourtau’s family, and while they indicate Seurat’s influence, they exhibit a more substantial use of pigment, and (unusual for painters of his time) a more serene use of color, giving them their own distinctive style. Though Pourtau’s promising career was cut sadly short by his premature death, works like Paysage Provencal stand as testimony to his position as “one of the most gifted artists carrying on the legacy of Neo-Impressionism.”4 1 “The Boston Orchestra: An Admirable Concert in the Metropolitan Opera House,” New York Times, November 2, 1894; E. Benezit, Dictionary of Artists/Benezit, vol. 11, (Paris: Grund, 2006), p. 297. 2 Because of uncertainty of Pourtau’s birth date, he was either 25 or 29 at the time of his death. 3 M.A. De Wolfe Howe, The Boston Symphony Orchestra: An Historical Sketch (Boston & New York: Houghton-Mifflin Company, 1914), p. 188. 4 E. Benezit, Dictionary of Artists/Benezit, vol. 11, (Paris: Grund, 2006), p. 297 Exhibition : One of a very small number of Pourtau’s known works, the present painting exemplifies his use of the pointillist technique made famous by his friend Georges Seurat (1959 – 1891). Though much remains to be learned about Pourtau’s life and career, he was a highly accomplished professional musician who spent several years in the United States hoping to earn enough to be able to devote himself exclusively to painting upon returning to France.1 Tragically, he died before his 30th birthday when La Bourgogne, the steamship carrying him back to France, sank off the coast of Sable Island, killing over 500 passengers and crew.2

    Apparently Pourtau never exhibited his work, though accounts of his time with the Boston Symphony identify him as “a painter of charming pictures,” suggesting his talents were widely known.3 A group of works remained within Pourtau’s family, and while they indicate Seurat’s influence, they exhibit a more substantial use of pigment, and (unusual for painters of his time) a more serene use of color, giving them their own distinctive style. Though Pourtau’s promising career was cut sadly short by his premature death, works like Paysage Provencal stand as testimony to his position as “one of the most gifted artists carrying on the legacy of Neo-Impressionism.”4


    1 “The Boston Orchestra: An Admirable Concert in the Metropolitan Opera House,” New York Times, November 2, 1894; E. Benezit, Dictionary of Artists/Benezit, vol. 11, (Paris: Grund, 2006), p. 297.
    2 Because of uncertainty of Pourtau’s birth date, he was either 25 or 29 at the time of his death.
    3 M.A. De Wolfe Howe, The Boston Symphony Orchestra: An Historical Sketch (Boston & New York: Houghton-Mifflin Company, 1914), p. 188.
    4 E. Benezit, Dictionary of Artists/Benezit, vol. 11, (Paris: Grund, 2006), p. 297
  • Léon POURTAU

    Léon POURTAU

    Biography : One of a very small number of Pourtau’s known works, the present painting exemplifies his use of the pointillist technique made famous by his friend Georges Seurat (1959 – 1891). Though much remains to be learned about Pourtau’s life and career, he was a highly accomplished professional musician who spent several years in the United States hoping to earn enough to be able to devote himself exclusively to painting upon returning to France.1 Tragically, he died before his 30th birthday when La Bourgogne, the steamship carrying him back to France, sank off the coast of Sable Island, killing over 500 passengers and crew.2 Apparently Pourtau never exhibited his work, though accounts of his time with the Boston Symphony identify him as “a painter of charming pictures,” suggesting his talents were widely known.3 A group of works remained within Pourtau’s family, and while they indicate Seurat’s influence, they exhibit a more substantial use of pigment, and (unusual for painters of his time) a more serene use of color, giving them their own distinctive style. Though Pourtau’s promising career was cut sadly short by his premature death, works like Paysage Provencal stand as testimony to his position as “one of the most gifted artists carrying on the legacy of Neo-Impressionism.”4 1 “The Boston Orchestra: An Admirable Concert in the Metropolitan Opera House,” New York Times, November 2, 1894; E. Benezit, Dictionary of Artists/Benezit, vol. 11, (Paris: Grund, 2006), p. 297. 2 Because of uncertainty of Pourtau’s birth date, he was either 25 or 29 at the time of his death. 3 M.A. De Wolfe Howe, The Boston Symphony Orchestra: An Historical Sketch (Boston & New York: Houghton-Mifflin Company, 1914), p. 188. 4 E. Benezit, Dictionary of Artists/Benezit, vol. 11, (Paris: Grund, 2006), p. 297 Exhibition : One of a very small number of Pourtau’s known works, the present painting exemplifies his use of the pointillist technique made famous by his friend Georges Seurat (1959 – 1891). Though much remains to be learned about Pourtau’s life and career, he was a highly accomplished professional musician who spent several years in the United States hoping to earn enough to be able to devote himself exclusively to painting upon returning to France.1 Tragically, he died before his 30th birthday when La Bourgogne, the steamship carrying him back to France, sank off the coast of Sable Island, killing over 500 passengers and crew.2

    Apparently Pourtau never exhibited his work, though accounts of his time with the Boston Symphony identify him as “a painter of charming pictures,” suggesting his talents were widely known.3 A group of works remained within Pourtau’s family, and while they indicate Seurat’s influence, they exhibit a more substantial use of pigment, and (unusual for painters of his time) a more serene use of color, giving them their own distinctive style. Though Pourtau’s promising career was cut sadly short by his premature death, works like Paysage Provencal stand as testimony to his position as “one of the most gifted artists carrying on the legacy of Neo-Impressionism.”4

    1 “The Boston Orchestra: An Admirable Concert in the Metropolitan Opera House,” New York Times, November 2, 1894; E. Benezit, Dictionary of Artists/Benezit, vol. 11, (Paris: Grund, 2006), p. 297.
    2 Because of uncertainty of Pourtau’s birth date, he was either 25 or 29 at the time of his death.
    3 M.A. De Wolfe Howe, The Boston Symphony Orchestra: An Historical Sketch (Boston & New York: Houghton-Mifflin Company, 1914), p. 188.
    4 E. Benezit, Dictionary of Artists/Benezit, vol. 11, (Paris: Grund, 2006), p. 297
  • Pierre-Auguste RENOIR

    Pierre-Auguste RENOIR

    Other Dealers:
    Also exhibited by:
    Galerie Boulakia
  • Chaim Soutine

    Chaim Soutine

    Other Dealers:
    Also exhibited by:
    Galerie Thomas
  • Gilbert Stuart

    Gilbert Stuart

  • Kees van Dongen

    Kees van Dongen

    Artist's Objects: Other Dealers:
    Also exhibited by:
    Alon Zakaim Fine Art
  • Martha Walter

    Martha Walter